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CHILD'S GAZETTEER OF JEFFERSON COUNTY
TOWN OF WILNA


The following family group descriptions are adapted from Hamilton Child's "Gazetteer of Jefferson County, N.Y.", published in 1890. The families are arranged alphabetically by township, and wherever possible, a link has been made to a Jefferson County Pioneer. We welcome any corrections and additions to the information presented.

This project has only been made possible through the efforts of several volunteers, directed by Shirley Farone, who has been a behind-the-scenes participant in this website from the very beginning. The original idea came from Sharon Patchett, who is also giving her time to the project. Sisters Marcia Alary and Barbara Britt, both of whom have been volunteering on other projects for the website, are also working on this. Gary Roe was one of the first to get his work in. We are grateful to each of them for making this material so easily available. More volunteers have made contributions as the task proceeded. Sharon Lagendyk's work has been extremely accurate and timely. Mark Wentling has undertaken a special project connected with the gazetteer. Eleanor Burrows here in Jefferson County, and Melinda Cornwell in Alaska are our newest volunteers.

FAMILY SKETCHES

Solomon Ashcraft came from Guilford, Vt., to the town of Wilna, about 1850, and located at Natural Bridge, where he engaged in the manufacture of broom handles where Graves's saw-mill now stands. He also owned the farm now occupied by Thomas Burgin, and there resided until his death, in 1879, aged 71 years. His son Eugene S. married Amelia Ann, daughter of Philip Covey, and they have four children, viz.: Jesse S., Lorenzo E., Jennie A., and Charles H. Mr. Ashcraft resides on road 25, and is a carpenter by trade. When 19 years of age, while hunting in the town of Vernon, Vt., he sustained an accident to his foot which necessitated its amputation.

J.T. Atwood was born in Morristown, St. Lawrence County, in 1832, whence he removed to the town of Champion, in 1860, and in 1887 located in Carthage village, in this town, where he keeps a hotel and feed stable, on Church street. He married Elizabeth Starling, by whom he has one daughter, Clara L., who married George B. Haas, and resides in this town.

H. D. Bingle, M.D., a native of Germany, came to America with his parents when a youth and located in Naumburg, Lewis County. He was educated in the district school and Lowville Academy, and in 1877, when 21 years of age, came to Carthage and commenced the study of medicine with Dr. N. D. Ferguson, with whom he continued until 1881. He attended a course of lectures in Baltimore, Md., in 1879, the Vermont University in 1880, and graduated from Dartmouth College in 1881. In 1882 he located in Denmark, in 1883 in Deer river, and in 1886 in Carthage, where he is now in practice. In 1889 he married Minnie C., daughter of W.R. Thompson, of Carthage.

Isaac Blanchard removed from Rhode Island to Deerfield, Oneida County, and thence to Wilna in 1811, where he located on road 44, on a farm now owned by Silas Smith. He married Patience Hall, by whom he had eight children, only one of whom, Isaac, Jr., is living. Isaac, Jr., married Eleanor Allen, daughter of Tunis, and they had four children, only one of whom, Patience, is living. Patience married James W. Burns and resides at Natural Bridge.

Jacob Bliss was born in Hartwick, Otsego County, N.Y., June 15, 1818, and in 1827 came with his parents to Watertown. He was married three times, first to Permelia Tallman, who bore him two children and died in 1852; second to Almira Derby, who bore him one child and died in 1856; and third to Margaret Killmer, who bore him one child. He has been a machinist since 1844, and has worked in Carthage since 1860. He carried on a machine shop in Belleville, Canada, six years, and in Watertown eight years. Mary, his only surviving child, resides with her parents. Orlando T. Bliss, son of Jacob, served in the 10th N.Y.H.A., and was promoted to captain.

Daniel Branagan came from County Meath, Ireland, and located in Lewis County, N.Y. about 1816. He married Sarah Illingsworth, of New Breman, about 1820, and removed to the town of Ellisburgh, whence he removed to Watertown in 1821, and located on the south side of the river. He erected a building, in which he conducted a grocery, where the R.W.& O. and U. & B. R. railroads cross, and which afterwards converted into a hotel, known as the Center House. In 1836 re removed to Wilna, and located on the farm now owned by Peter McQuillen. He resided in Wilna until 1849, when he removed to the town of Croghan, Lewis County, locating on the farm now occupied by his son Samuel, where he died in 1864. His wife died in 1884. Of their family of six sons and three daughters, five are living, viz.: Mary A. (Mrs. R.W. Eddy), of Cordova, Minn.; Agnes (Mrs. G.A Kilborn), of Minneapolis, Minn.; Sarah (Mrs. William Graham), of Carthage; and Daniel and Samuel, who reside in Croghan. Daniel served nearly three years in Battery D, 1st N.Y. Lt. Art. Samuel Branagan was born February 22, 1837, and in August, 1863 enlisted in Co. E, 20th N.Y. Cav., and was mustered out in August 31, 1865. He married, first, Maryette Yule, who born him three children,-- Hattie L., Gertie, and George H.,- and second, Elizabeth Kesler, by whom he had four children, Frederick G., Charles, Maggie, and Samuel.

[A correction to this information may be found at Correction]

Dr. H. E. Brown, son of James, was born in Malone, Franklin County, December 25, 1864. He remained in Malone until 14 years of age, going thence to Montreal, where he entered St. Mary's College, in 1878, and there remained four years, graduating in 1882. He began reading medicine with Dr. C. McConnell in the fall of 1882, in Hoganburg, Franklin County, in the spring of 1883 went to the University of the city of New York and received the title of M.D. March 12, 1887, afterwards spending nearly two years in Bellevue and other hospitals. He came to Carthage, December 14, 1888, where he is now in practice.

Remsen R. Brown, son of Peter, was born in Sharon, Schoharie County, N.Y., August 4, 1810. His father, Peter Brown, located in the town of Antwerp, July 5, 1821, where he took up a tract of land, and here remined until his death. Of his nine children, three are living. Remsen R., when 18 years of age, removed to Albany, N.Y., and worked in the Albany Coffee House winters, and on the Erie Canal summers. From 1831 till 1835 he ran a packet boat on the canal from Albany to Schenectady. In 1836 he located in Felt's Mills, in the town of Rutland, where he married Philena, daughter of Joseph and Jemima Stebbins, in 1836, and in May of the same year bought the hotel of his wife's father, and conducted it until 1854, when he sold out and located in Carthage. Here he bought the Henry's Hotel, which he rebuilt and enlarged, and named Brown's Hotel, which was burned July 6, 1861. August 24, of the same year, he commenced the erection of the hotel now known as the Levis House, into which he moved in November of that year. He kept this hotel until 1864, when he leased it, and in 1869 sold it to O.S. Levis and opened a general store, which he conducted until 1886, when he leased his store to Frank Failing and retired from active business. Mr. Brown had born to him two children, Jerome R., now a banker and real estate dealer in Parsons, Kansas, and Mary E. (Mrs. O. S. Levis), who died June 7, 1887.

Joseph P. Brownell, son of C. B., was born in the town of Duanesburg, N.Y., January 29, 1827. In 1849 he came to Carthage and entered the land office of Le Ray de Chaumont, as an assistant of his uncle, Nelson Rulison, who was a surveyor, and under whose direction Joseph P. learned surveying. In 1856 he married Parthenia S., daughter of Osmon Caswell, of Theresa, and settled in West Carthage. In 1862 he removed to Croghan, Lewis County; in 1866 was elected justice of the peace; and in 1870-71 served as supervisor of that town. In 1873 he returned to Carthage, where he has since resided. In 1876-77 he served as justice of the peace, and is now one of the assessors of the town. He is well known in the county as a surveyor, and has been connected with the Le Ray land office since 1849. He has three sons living, Hiram M., James P., and Charles M.

Thomas Burns, from Ireland, located in Carthage in 1829. About 1831 he removed to Lewis County, and two years later returned to Wilna, where he died in 1880. He followed the occupation of farming. His wife, Catharine Gormley, bore him 12 children, 10 of whom survive. His son James W. was born November 16, 1837. In 1864 he enlisted in Co. A, 186th Regt. N.Y. Vols., and was discharged June 2, 1865. He participated in the battles of Hatcher's Run and Petersburg, and in the last named battle was wounded in the head by a piece of shell. In 1866 he married Patience, daughter of Isaac Blanchard, by whom he has three children, John, Mabel, and Guy. Mr. Burns has always resided in this town, and for many years has been engaged in the lumber business.

Milton H. Carter, son of Zeboaim, was born in Lewis County in 1807. In 1837, with his wife, Sarah, he came to Wilna. He located on the farm on road 6 now owned by Joseph Brewster, and here resided until 1848, when he removed to the farm now owned by his son, W.B. Carter., on road 12. Here he resided until 1866, when he removed to Denmark, Lewis County, where he died in 1874. He was supervisor of Wilna in 1845, and also held other town offices. He had a family of eight children, six of whom are living, viz.: Norris M. is a physician in Brooklyn, N.Y.; Maria T. (Mrs. James Seaman) resides in the town of Philadelphia; Ellen O. (Mrs. Merritt Fargo) resides in this town; Hannibal Z. and Frank L. reside in Stamford, Conn.; and W.B. occupies the homestead farm on road 12, in this town. The latter married Louise, daughter of Jonathan Aldrich, and they have two children, Eugene W. and Josephine L., who reside at home. Mr. Carter enlisted in Co. E, 20th N.Y. Cav., in 1863, served as quartermaster-sergeant, and was discharged in the fall of 1864.

Zebina Chaffee, son of Clifford, was born in Westminister, Vt., and about 1818 or '19 came to Wilna and located at Natural Bridge. He was a carpenter by trade, and assisted in building the Bonaparte house. He died in 1850. He married Lucy Nutting, of Westminister, Vt., and they had six children, viz.: Marab, Eliza Ann, Lucy J., Lucia A., Ira V., and Zebina O., of whom Mrs. Oren Saunders and Ira V. are the only survivors. Ira V. was born in Natural Bridge, June 25, 1821. He married Eliza, daughter of Stiles Brown, of Diana, Lewis County, in 1850, and first located on road 26. In 1863 he removed to the farm he now occupies. He has four children, viz.: Charles C., of Bryant, Dakota; Mary A. (Mrs. William Sly) and Lewis R. of Diana, Lewis County; and Ira S., who resides with his parents.

Jacob Clearwater, son of Daniel, was born in Marbletown, Ulster County, and about 1836 came to the town of Wilna. About 1842 he located upon the farm, on road 79, now occupied by his son Daniel. He married Hester Sheley, of Johnstown, N.Y., by whom he had five sons and two daughters. His son Daniel was born in Johnstown. He married Helen, daughter of V.P. Hanson, of Theresa, and they have one son, Victor H., who lives with his parents.

William Cooper came from France about 1800 and located in the town of Le Ray, where he engaged in farming. Of his family of five sons and two daughters there are now living a son and a daughter, viz.: Alexander, who resides in the town of Theresa, and Mrs. Angelica Becker, who resides on road 14, in this town, at the advanced age of 84.

Calvin Cowan, son of Isaac, was born in Lanesborough, Mass., and when young located in Lewis County, N.Y., where he married Abi Weed, of Lowville. About 1819 he settled in Depauville, and nine years later located near the center of the town of Wilna, where he remained but a few years. After the death of his wife he resided with his son Herman until his decease. He had eight children, viz.: Calvin, Herman, Eliza, Clarinda, Augusta, Edwin, and William. Herman Cowan was born in Depauville, April 1, 1819. In 1846 he married Almira M. Frasier, of Wilna, and settled on the farm now owned by Warren Crowner, and a few years later removed to the farm he now occupies. His wife died in 1888. They had eight children, three of whom survive, namely: Edgar F., Emma (Mrs. John Hastings), and Charley E., all residents of this town. Mr Cowan married, second, Mrs. Margaretta H. Townsend.

Joel Crowner, son of Truman, married, first, Antice Lamb, daughter of Isaac, by whom he had eight children, viz.: Lucy, Emerancy, Ambrose, Mary, States, Ada, Dora, and William B. For his second wife he married Susan Crowner, widow of Peter.

Peter Crowner, son of Truman, married Susan, daughter of William Adams, of Antwerp, and located on the farm now occupied by his son Marion. He had born to him seven children, viz.: Amyr, who enlisted in Co. I, 14th N.Y.H.A., and was killed in battle at Petersburg, Va., June 17, 1864, Mucious, Truman A., Hubert B., Marion, Louisa E., and Byron (deceased). Peter Crowner died January 13, 1865. His widow married Joel Crowner.

Truman Crowner, son of Peter, was born in Washington County, N.Y. He married Polly Clintsman and located in the town of Denmark, Lewis County, where he reared a family of 10 sons and three daughters, all of whom attained mature years, viz.: Alson, Alpheus, Joel, Peter, Johnson, Nathaniel, States, Louisa, Warren, Elizabeth, John, Lucinda, and Silas. About 1830 he removed to Wilna and located near the center of the town, where he remained until his death. States Crowner married Lorinda M., daughter of Orlo Stanard, in 1852, and located on the farm he now occupies.

Harry Davis removed from Saratoga County, N.Y., to the town of Pamelia, with his mother, about 1812, and there lived until about 1838, when he removed to the town of Philadelphia, and settled at Sterlingville. He drove stage from Watertown to Sterlingville and Antwerp, and was well known in the locality. He married Martha C. Foster, by whom he had four children, three of whom are living, viz.: George N., of Carthage, and James H. and Martha F. (Mrs. Martin De Tamble), of West Carthage village. James H. married Ida A. VanAmber, and they have had three children, one of whom, Hattie I., is living.

William Dawley came to Newport, Herkimer County, to Wilna, in 1819, and took up 50 acres of land on road 38. He was a mason and worked at his trade in Watertown for several seasons. He had eight children, six of whom are living, viz.: Darius H., James H., Nathan, William, Caroline (Mrs. Colvin Carow, Jr.), and Eveline. Darius H. married Lucinda Williamson, daughter of John, and they have five children, viz.: Edgar, Elisha, George, De Witt, and Josephine A. (Mrs. John Connell).

William H. Delmore, son of Thomas, was born in Croghan, Lewis County, June 8, 1858. He worked upon a farm and attended district school until 1872, when he came to Carthage and opened a meat market in company with John Pittock, with whom he continued for a short time. In 1880 he opened a grocery and meat market, which he continued about five years. In 1885 he bought the Cold Spring Brewery, which burned in 1888. In 1887-88-89 he served as supervisor of the town, was reelected for the term of 1890, and in 1889 was elected president of the village of Carthage. October 17, 1876, he married Ellen O'Connor, and they have two children. In 1887 he built the Delmore block, one of the finest buildings in Carthage village. He is largely interested in real estate and in the prosperity of the village.

Benjamin Derby came from Huntington, Vt., to Wilna in 1826, and settled on the farm now occupied by his son Harley, where he took up 100 acres of land. He served in the War of 1812, and his father, also named Benjamin, served seven years in the Revolutionary War. Of his 10 children, only four are living, viz.: Dr. E.G., Maria (Mrs. E. Smith), Cyrena (Mrs. C. Furman), and Harley, who resides on the old homestead. The latter married Lydia, daughter of William Heaton, and they have had nine children, three of whom are living, viz.: Reuben A., who resides with his parents; James M., of Morrison, Ill.; and William H., of Rico, Colorado. George W. Derby, son of Harley, enlisted in Co. L, 9th N.Y. Cav., and died in hospital, at Washington, D.C., June 9, 1862. Fernando H., another son, enlisted in Co. L, 9th N.Y. Cav., in August, 1862, and died at Fairfax Court House, Va., November 14, 1862. Luther B. died at home January 25, 1884.

John James Devois immigrated from Paris, France, with his wife and one son, Francis, about 1797, and located at Beaver River, Lewis County, N.Y., where he died about 1803. About 1808 Francis Devois came to this town with his mother and located upon the farm now occupied by his son Charles. He married Margaret Daley, by whom he had eight children, five of whom are living, viz.: Ortens (Mrs. William Southworth), of Rutland; Rossena (Mrs. Luman Osmer), of Watertown; Simeon, who resides in California; and Charles and Mary, who live with their mother on the old homestead.

Oliver Dodge came from Litchfield County, Conn., to Wilna in 1839, and located on the farm now owned by Henry Swind, on road 29, where he took up 200 acres. He married Temperance Gallup, and they reared a family of 10 children, five of whom are living, namely: Ann E., Abby J., Louisa R., Joseph F., and L.G.

Amos Draper, who came from Rhode Island, was one of the early settlers of the town of Wilna. He came when a young man with his father and located on the farm now occupied by his son Philorus. He married Sibyl Tift, daughter of Johnson, and they had 13 children, 10 of whom were living at the time of his death. Samuel Draper, son of Amos, was born in 1825. He married Harriet, daughter of Ephraim Smith. In January, 1862, he enlisted in Co. I, 94th N.Y. Vols., and participated in the battles of Fredericksburg, Wilderness, and Petersburg, and was discharged in 1865.

Charles S. Drury, son of Charles H., was born in Canton, St. Lawrence County, in 1856. He graduated from the medical department of the University of Vermont, at Burlington, in 1880, and the same year commenced the practice of his profession at Great Bend, in the town of Champion. In April, 1883, he located at Natural Bridge, where he now resides. He married Addie M., daughter of Sidney Morrison, of Winooski, Vt., and they have one daughter, Vera A., born September 29, 1884.

Frank T. Evans was born in Trenton, Oneida County, May 14, 1852; came to Carthage with his parents, John and Louisa Evans, in 1865; went to school and worked in his father's tin shop; graduated from the academic department of the Carthage Union Free School in 1873; taught district schools and studied law; was admitted to the bar at a General Term of the Supreme Court held at Rochester, April 7, 1876; located at Clayton, in May 1876, where he practiced until 1881, when he returned to Carthage. He was elected special surrogate of Jefferson County in November, 1882, reelected in November, 1885, and again in November of 1888.

John Farr, son of John, came from Pennsylvania to the town of Wilna at an early day, located in Carthage village, and engaged in making iron for Mr. Le Ray. He married Susan McClain, by whom he had six sons and six daughters, nine of whom are living, two in this town, viz; John, who resides on a farm near Bochanan's steam mill, and V.L., who resides in the village of Carthage, where hs was born. The latter married Abby J. Allen and they have five children living, viz; Fred, an engineer on the C. & A. R. R., who married Charlotte Catlin and lives in Carthage; James, a mason, who resides with his parents; Lydia A.( Mrs. James Scott), who lives in this town; and Eddie and Lillie, who reside with their parents. Mr. Farr enlisted in Co. B, 35th Regt. N.Y. Vols., in 1861, was wounded, and discharged the same year. He reenlisted in Co. E, 20th N.Y. Cav., in 1863, and was discharged in August, 1865.

Milo B. Fisher, son of Miles, was born in the town of Antwerp in 1839. In 1864 he enlisted in Co. I, 2nd Mass. Cav., and was mustered out in 1865. He married, first, Mary Lee, of Alexandria; second, Emily Gordon; and third, Mary Jane Curran. He is now engaged in manufacturing the Fisher truss, on road 38.

Caleb Fulton, son of James, was born in 1777. He came from Coleraine, Mass., to Wilna, in 1810, and took up 50 acres of land and built a log house on road 62, where his son's wife, Mrs. Angeline Fulton, now lives. He had born to him nine children, viz: Fanny, Simeon, Mary, Sally, James, Lydia, Filura, William, and Elisha, only two of whom, Simeon and Sally, are living. Simeon was born April 4, 1809. He married Larrissa, daughter of John Smith, of Wilna, and located on road 62, where he now resides. He was supervisor of this town in 1847, '48, and '49, and was also notary public and school commissioner for several years. He has one adopted daughter, Julia A., who married Myron Lewis, Jr., and has two children, Eon F. and Roy E. Mr. Fulton was a captain of militia. He owns the second oldest house in this town that is occupied.

Elisha Fulton, son of Caleb, was born in 1823. He married Angelica Clearwater and settled on the old homestead. He had five children, of whom four are living, viz.: Maria L., Sedate H., Joseph E., and Clark A. He was a farmer and died in November, 1886.

Cranson Gates came from the East and located in the town of Wilna about 1830, settling on a farm on road 68, where he remained a few years, when he removed to the farm now owned by W.J. Scott, and here resided until his death. He owned a saw-mill known as the Gates mill. He reared a family of seven children, viz.: Vinton, Frederick H., Linus M., Julius K., Lucia M., Susan C., and Cranson O. Julius K. was born January 11, 1836. He was the first to enlist from the town of Wilna, in April, 1861, and served in Co.B, 35th N.Y. Vols.

George Gilbert, son of Berzilla and Asenath Gilbert, was born December 18, 1828, in the town of Northampton, in what is now the county of Fulton (then Montgomery County). His ancestors were of French and English descent, and his grandparents were natives of Connecticut, where his mother was also born, his father being a native of this state. Both of his grandfathers served in the Revolutionary War. Mr. Gilbert was educated in the select and common schools of his native town, and in Kingsboro Academy in the town of Johnstown. He commenced the study of law in the spring of 1851, with Wesley W. Gleason, in the village of Fish House, in his native town, was admitted to the bar of this state at a General Term held in the town of Salem, in June, 1853, and was admitted to practice in the district courts of the United States in 1862. June 30, 1854, Mr. Gilbert located in Carthage village, where he subsequently resided, with a large clientage and a successful practice. The fall preceding his coming to Carthage he was a candidate for the office of district attorney, in the county of Fulton, on the Democratic ticket, but suffered defeat with the rest of the ticket. He served as town clerk and justice of the peace each one term. From 1861 his influence was with the Republican party. July 7, 1875, Mr. Gilbert was married to Hattie C. McAllister, daughter of Harvel McAllister, of Stowe, Vt., by whom he had four children, viz.: George McA., Bruce B., Laura E., and Ernest H. Mr. Gilbert was a prominent citizen of the town, and was identified with the principal enterprises for its commercial advancement. It was through his efforts that the requisite legislation was secured in favor of the construcation of the last lock and dam upon what is known as the "Black River improvement," which was really the completion of the Black River Canal. He was vice-president, secretary, director, and general manager of the Black River & St. Lawrence Railway Company, whose interests were afterwards merged in the Carthage & Adirondack Railway Company, and was a member of the first board of directors in the latter organization. He died at his home in Carthage, after a brief illness, March 19, 1890.

Benjamin G. Hall came from Deerfield, Oneida County, to Wilna, about 1810, and settled on a farm on road 44. He reared a family of eight children, four of whom are living, namely: Sylvester in Minnesota; Hiram on road 38, in this town, where he was born in 1812; Lydia resides in Wisconsin; and Luther P., who was born in this town in 1815, and now resides on road 22. William, son of Luther, enlisted in Co. K, 20th N.Y. Cav., in 1863, and was mustered out in 1865.

Thomas R. Hall came from New York city to Wilna in 1858, and located in the north part of the town, on a farm now owned by his son Norman, where he died in 1871. Of his children, four are living, namely: Norman, Marion, Emma (Mrs. W.W. Thurston), and Thaddeus. The latter lives in the town of Philadelphia.

Charles T. Hammond died in Carthage, March 24, 1865, aged 28 years, 10 months, and 15 days. His versatile talents commanded the respect of all, while his warm heart and social nature won for him the love of a wide and extended circle of friends. Although a young man, his ability as a lawyer had already given him a good position among the members of the Jefferson County bar, while in political circles he had been honored by his party (Democratic) as their candidate for member of Assembly in this district. His muscial talents were of a high order, and his oratorical powers were the occasion of frequent calls from his constituents at home and abroad, for their exercise at public and political meetings. His death was deeply deplored in the community among a wide circle of friends and acquaintances, a feeling of regret and sadness being generally experienced that a life which gave such brilliant promise should end so early and suddenly.

John D. Hammond was born in New Lebanon, N.Y., in 1780. He was the son of Rev. John Hammond, a noted divine in the Baptist Church, and also a celebrated surveyor, who did much service in this northern country, and whose father and grandfather came from England and settled at Providence, R.I. Rev. John died at Albany in 1821, aged 84 years. John D. Hammond accompanied his father in his explorations and surveying trips, as did his two brothers, Werden and Calvin. They surveyed routes from Utica to Sackets Harbor, Long Falls, and Ogdensburg. These pioneer roads were surveyed about the beginning of the present century. John D. Hammond, in 1808, married Hellanah Settle, daughter of Peter and Katie (Yost) Settle, of Johnstown, N.Y. When the war broke out he joined the army at Sackets Harbor, and remained there a year and a half, acting as quartermaster. At the close of the war he returned to the business of surveying, at which, with others, he was engaged in Lewis and several other counties, until, in 1820, he removed his family to Le Raysville, and entered the service of Mr. James Le Ray, by whom he was employed several years, and afterwards by his son Vincent. In 1821 he surveyed and plotted the village of Carthage, where he removed in 1822, and built him a home on the site of the present Baptist Church, the house being destroyed by the fire of 1884. Mr. Hammond subsequently surveyed much of the lands belonging to Joseph Bonaparte (Count de Survelliers), laying out the roads and locating the principal division lines. He died after a brief illness, August 7, 1836, aged 56 years. His family consisted of seven sons and five daughters. He had been greatly assisted in his surveys by his sons, and the eldest, Theodore S., soon became adept at the business, but he eventually gave his attention chiefly to the law.

Theodore S. Hammond, son of John D., attended the schools in Carthage village until 19 years of age. He was then, for a short time, employed by Jasan Fairbanks, of Watertown, and afterwards in the county clerk's office. At the age of 21 he married Mary A., daughter of E. Wilkins, of Watertown, and shortly after removed to Canton, St. Lawrence County, where he was engaged in surveying for two years. He then returned to Carthage, opened a land office on Water street, and commenced the study of law with Marcus Bickford. He became one of the leading lawyers in this locality, and at the time of his death was an extensive land owner. He built the residence now occupied by his son Henry W. Of his three sons, Charles T., Frederick, and Henry W., the latter is the only survivor. Charles T. was a prominent lawyer and Mason, and was a master of the lodge in Carthage at the time of his death. Henry W. is superintendent of the eastern division of the R., W. & O. Railroad, in whose employ he has been several years. He married Alvira, daughter of Henry and Alvira Rich.

Peter Hanson came from Lowville, Lewis County, to this town, in 1838, and settled on the farm now owned by John Kelley. He served in the War of 1812, and participated in the battle of Sackets Harbor. He reared a family of nine children, four sons and five daughters, all of whom are living. Mr. Hanson died in 1871.

Thomas Hastings came from Massachussetts and located in the town of Champion in 1808. In 1816 he located on the farm on road 45, in this town, where his son Joseph now lives. He had born to him 10 children,- five sons and five daughters,- only one of whom, Joseph, is living. Joseph married Rachel Van Antwerp, by whom he had eight children, seven of whom are living.

John Hathway was one of the early settlers of Antwerp, where he was engaged in the business of wagonmaking. He married for his second wife Mary Andrews, by whom he had six children, five of whom survive. One son, William, resides in the village of Natural Bridge, and is a blacksmith. He married Florence M. Tyler, daughter of Reuben, of Diana, Lewis County, and they have three children, viz.: Elbert J., Fred E., and Lillies J.

David Hewitt came to Wilna about the year 1800, and built a log house where Charles Horr's grocery now stands, and where his son John was born, in 1805, the second white child born in the village of Carthage. John Hewitt married Hepsey S. Bassett, daughter of Hezekiah, and two of their children are living, viz,: Wheeler B., in Denver, Col., and Clark G., in Honolulu, Sandwich Islands. Mr. Hewitt was a carpenter and machinist, and was well known throughout the county. He died November 20, 1878.

Seth Hooker came from New Britain, Conn., and located in Cathage about 1817, where he opened a general store and kept the post office, the revenue from the office then being less than $25 a year. He was a postmaster more than 20 years. After 15 years of active business life failing health compelled him to retire. He married Calista Nimocks, and their children were Horace, Ralph, and Sarah L. He died in 1882 and his wife in 1888. Horace Hooker has been in the clothing in Carthage since 1849.

Joel B. Hurlburt, son of Josiah, was born in Diana, Lewis County, October 20, 1840. He married, first, Lucena, daughter of Nicholas Mealous, of Antwerp, in 1860, by whom he had three children, viz.: Lawson U., Bliss A., and Lulionia (Mrs. George Schultz), of Harrisville, Lewis County. For his second wife he married Cora, daughter of Wesley Blanchard, of Diana, and they have two children, Mateland and Cora P. In August, 1862, Mr. Hurlburt enlisted in Co. C. 10th N. Y. H. A., and in 1863 was discharged for disability. In 1870 he came to this town and entered the employ of Thomas Proctor, at Natural Bridge. In 1875 he erected a small building and opened a grocery and meat market. In 1877 he built the store he now occupies, and in 1878 built the Hurlburt House. In 1888 he erected the opera house and also put up several dwellings. In politics he has always been a Democrat.

John Johnson removed from Clayville, Oneida County, and located in Carthage village, where he resided about 16 years, where he removed to Fullersville, St. Lawrence County, where he died. He was a molder and iron worker by trade. Of his seven children, John B. was a merchant in Carthage for a long time and now resides in Gouverneur; Julia A. married J.P. Hodgkins, of Carthage, and now lives in Brooklyn, N.Y.; Epaphroditus now resides in Carthage. The latter was born in April 3, 1814, and in 1838 married Martha L. Gates and settled in Sterlingville, where he worked at the moulding and iron working trade. Upon the death of his wife, about 11 months after their marriage, he removed to Wilna, where he married Cornelia, daughter of Rev. Harvey De Wolf, and located upon a farm for five years. He then resided in Turin, Lewis County, Wilna, Brownville, Theresa, and in Pennsylvania, and in 1874 returned to Carthage, where he now resides. He has had eight children, viz.: Martha S. (Mrs. Volney Marsh) and John H., of Carthage; Charles E. (deceased), who was station agent on the Emelton & Shepingville Railroad, at Turkey City, Pa.; James F. of Rochester, Ind.; Bruce G., of Findley's Lake, N.Y.: Anna A (Mrs. R.S. Perrine), of Chicago, Ill,; Mary F. (Mrs. Barr), of Chicago, Ill.; and Estella H. (Mrs. R.C. Robertson), of Bay City, Mich. Mr. Johnson enlisted in Co. E, 16th Penn. Cav., January 4, 1863, and was discharged November 28, 1865.

Dr. P. E. Johnson came from Cooperstown, Otsego County, where he had practiced medicine for 20 years, and located in Natural Bridge about 1853. In 1854 he purchased a tract of timber land and engaged in lumbering, and subsequently for a few years, engaged in tanning. He also practiced his profession from 1870 to 1882, when he retired. He is now living, aged 77 years.

Paul Keyes came from Montgomery County, N.Y., to this town, about 1820, and located on road 58, where Mrs. Lovina Carter now resides, where he built a log house and engaged in farming. He had a family of eight children, namely: Sally, Armina, Mariette, Samuel, Adelia, Harrison, Caroline, and Celia. Samuel, the only one now living in this town, married Mary, daughter of Caleb Fulton, and located upon the farm he now occupies. He has three sons and one daughter living, viz.: George, Samuel, Jr., Caleb, and Albreda (Mrs. R. Palmer). Mr. Keyes has been supervisor of this town, and has held several other offices of trust.

C.C. Lake, son of Jesse, was born in Genesee County, N.Y., May 8, 1838. In 1862 he removed with his wife to this town and located at Natural Bridge, where he engaged in carpentering. August 17, 1864, he enlisted in Co. A, 186th N.Y. Vols., and was discharged June 13, 1865. He participated in the battle of Petersburg. He has been justice of the peace several years and is now in the manufacturing business. He has two children, Fred and Laura, both of whom reside in this town.

H.K. Lamphear, son of Jeremiah, was born August 1, 1838. In 1860 he married Achsah C. Loomis, daughter of Wilson, of Champion. In August, 1864, he enlisted in Co. A, 186th N.Y. Vols., and was discharged in June 1865. He has resided at his present location since 1868. He has two children, Wilson L. and Lillian A.

Lewis Lanphear came to the town of Wilna at an early day and settled on the farm now owned by L.G. Stanard. Jeremiah Lanphear, son of Lewis, married Fannie, daughter of Caleb Fulton, and settled on the farm where his son Nelson W. now lives, and here resided until his death. Of his family of eight children three are living, viz; Nelson W. and Hiram K. in this town and Simeon F. in Crystal Spring, Yates County.

Nelson W. Lanphear, son of Jeremiah and Fanny (Fulton) Lanphear, was born in the town of Wilna, June 16, 1841. In August, 1863, he enlisted in Co. A, 20th N.Y. Cav., and was discharged in May, 1865, from Balfour Hospital. In November, 1870, he married Sarah M., daughter of Abram and Samantha (Loomis) Smith., and settled on the homestead, where he resided until 1889, when he removed to Carthage village. He has three children, Bert S., Fanny S., and Fred.

Ephraim Lewis came to Wilna about 1808 and located in the north part of the town, where he took up a large tract of land, including the farm now occupied by his grandson, Sanford Lewis. He built a log hotel, where he entertained travelers for a number of years, when he traded with his son Stephen for the farm now occupied by W. B. Carter. He afterwards removed to Ohio, where he died. His son, Capt. Stephen Lewis, kept the hotel several years, and about 1843 Sanford, son of Stephen, became proprietor, and has remained there to the present time.

Granson Lewis married Merab N. Chaffee, daughter of Zebina Chaffee, who came from Vermont. Mr. Lewis located on the farm now occupied by Mrs. Caroline Lewis, widow of Nelson, and here kept a hotel. He had five children, viz.: Nelson, Emeline, Hendrickson, Columbus, and Lucia A., of whom two are living, Columbus, in Oakland, Cal., and Lucia A. (Mrs. John R. Washburn).

Joseph Loomis, one of the first settlers of Windsor, Conn., came from Braintree, Eng., in 1638. Jonathan Loomis, a descendant of Joseph, removed with his wife, six sons, and two daughters, from Pittsfield, Mass., and located in the town of Champion in 1808, on a farm now occupied by Henry Ingraham. He did faithful service for his country in the Revolutionary War. His children all settled in Champion, and at one time his was the most numerous family in the town. Alvin, one of the sons, married Nancy Waite, of Bennington, Vt., and located near the foot of Pleasant Lake, on the farm now owned by William Smith. Here he reared a family of eight sons and four daughters, six of whom are now living. He served in the War of 1812, and participated in the battle of Sackets Harbor. He died April 19, 1858, aged 74 years, and his widow November 22, 1871, aged 83 years.

Manly Loomis, son of Alvin, was born September 7, 1817. He married Rachel Baldwin, of Albany, N.Y., in 1839, and in 1841 removed to village of Carthage and engaged in black-smithing on Water street, near his present location. In 1857 he commenced the manufacture of carriages, in which business he has been engaged longer that any other person in town. Mr. Loomis was the second man in town to vote the Abolitionist ticket, and his house was the refuge of the colored man. He was at one time the candidate of the Abolitionist party for member of Assembly. He has always been a strong temperance man, and is now, at an advanced age, an active business man. His family consists of three sons and two daughters, viz.: George, Stoel W., Jay A., Laura, and Lucelia M. The latter married Frank G. Willis and resides in Rochester. George served three years in 2nd N. Y. H. A.., and resides in this town. Stoel W. also served in the 2nd N.Y.H.A., and held the offices of corporal and sergeant. He is now engaged in business with his father. Jay A. also carries on an extensive business on Water street in Carthage.

Hiram McCollom, of whom frequent mention has been made in connection with the industries of Carthage village, came to Carthage, as near as can be ascertained, about 1831 or '32. Previous to this he kept a small store in the village of Denmark. Concluding that Carthage offered a wider field for the exercise of that indomitable energy of which he possessed, he came here and made a beginning of his long and remarkable business career. His prominent characteristics were energy, industry, and perserverance. To enter upon a description of the numerous enterprises conceived and put into operation by him would be to give the history of his life, and a great part of this history of the village where he resided. In connection with his principal business, that of a merchant, Mr. McCollom carried on the tin business and manufacture of boots and shoes, employing a large number of men. According to an article in the Carthagenian his fine brick block, three stories in height and covering an area of 100 by 40 feet, was completed and occupied in 1839. In 1846 he put in operation the extensive nail factory and rolling-mill, of which previous mention has been made, and in 1852 started the Bank of Carthage. From the starting of the Carthagenian in 1839, up to its removal to Gouverneur in 1849, he was the principal owner of the printing press in Carthage. The cotton factory, burnt in 1856, was a splendid building for that purpose, or might have been utilized for other manufacturing purposes if required. Mr. McCollom was an able and strenuous advocate of the Black River Canal in the early days, when its completion seemed so important to the interests of the village. He carried into all his relations with his fellowmen, for whatever seemed to him for the general good, the same untiring zeal whcih characterized his other actions. He died in Carthage, October 2, 1876.

James McQuillen married Mary McMannis, daughter of Paul, who was an early settler here. He had four children, viz.: Dennis, Paul, Peter, and James, and was killed by a falling tree, June 19, 1846. His son Peter married Catharine Riley, daughter of William, and located on road 89, in this town, where he took up 442 acres of wild land in 1871, which he has since cleared. In 1864 he enlisted in Co. A, 186th Regt. N.Y. Vols., and participated in the battles of Hatcher's Run and Petersburg.

Eber Mayne came from Canada to this town in 1858, and located on the farm on road 16 now occupied by his widow. He followed the dual occupation of blacksmith and farmer. He married Susannah, daughter of John Smith, by whom he had a daughter, Florence O., who married Dan Sterling and has two children, Julia and Heber, and resides on road 16.

Moses C. Merrill, son of Moses, was born in Connecticut, and about 1806 removed to the town of Champion, where he married Philena, daughter of Abel and Elizabeth Crandall, and settled on the farm now owned by his granddaughter, Mrs. Mary Coffeen. He was a deacon in the Baptist Church for many years, and died in 1838. His wife died about 1855. He had a family of 15 children, 13 of whom attained mature years. Their names were Elizabeth, Waitstill, Eliza, Moses L., Samuel, Lucretia, Sybial, John H., Harriet, Athelea, Mary S., Eveline, and Miner C. Moses L. Merrill was born in Champion in 1811. He married Lovina, daughter of Moses Miller, and removed to the town of Antwerp, where he remained about three years, when he returned to Champion. He had two sons, Erwin M., born October 16, 1836, and Samuel L., born May 29, 1838. In October, 1861, Erwin M. enlisted as second lietenant in Co. I, 94th N.Y. Vols., and resigned September 13, 1862. In 1864 he was commissioned captain of Co. K. 17th Regt. U.S. Col. Inf., and was mustered out April 25, 1866. Dr. Samuel L Merrill was educated in the common schools, and in 1861 commenced the study of medicine with Dr. G. N. Hubbard. In 1864 he entered the army as a contract surgeon, and was located at Nashville, Tenn. He graduated from the medical college at Nashville in 1865, and in May of the same year, entered the 17th Regt. U.S. Col. Inf. as assistant surgeon, and was with the regiment until 1866, when he was mustered out. He then came to Carthage and engaged in the drug business with his brother E. M. In 1875 he sold his interest to his brother, and commenced the practice of his profession. In 1877 he removed to the village of Mannsville, in the town of Ellisburgh, and there remained 10 years, when he returned to Carthage, where he now resides. He married, first, Mary E. Osborn, by whom he had three children, one of whom, Anna A., is living. He married for his second wife Ellen E. Brown, of Mansville. Erwin M. Merrill married Ellen M. Gates, daughter of Isaac Gates, of Gouverneur, by whom he had seven children, three of whom are living, viz.: Ray W., Maud A., and Ethel. His wife died in 1888. He is engaged in the drug business in Carthage.

Joseph Mick, son of Michael, came to Wilna, from New Jersey, about 1829. He was a molder, and worked in the foundry, and also purchased and worked the farm now occupied by George Hosford. He married Alice, daughter of Thomas Gustin, and they had three children: George W., of Forestport, N.Y.; Norris J., of Chicago; and Emogene E., who married John Murphy, and has a son, Charles J., who is a newsboy on the C. & A Railroad.

John W. Nichols, son of Platt R., of Denmark, Lewis County, was born November 25, 1834. He married Laura A., daughter of Joseph Hastings, of Wilna, and they have two sons and two daughters, viz.: Leon J., George A., Dora E., and Jettie M. In September, 1864, he enlisted in Co. A. 186th N.Y. Vols., served in the battles of Hatcher's Run and Petersburg, and was discharged in June, 1865. He is a carpenter by trade and resides in this town.

William O'Horo, son of Thomas, was born in Canada, March 4, 1863. At the age of 14 years he enlisted in Co. D, 44th N.Y. Regt., "Ellsworth Avengers," and participated in the battles of Wilderness, Petersburg, Weldon Railroad, Five Forks, Hatcher's Run, Pegram Farm, Laurel Hill, and Appomattox Court House. In the battle of the Wilderness he was struck on the head with a piece of shell, and was sent to Douglass Hospital, at Washington. He was transfered from the 44th to the 146th Regt., and was discharged in August, 1865. He married Ellen Coughlin, and they have two children, John T. and George P.A.

George Olley was born in England, in 1802, and in 1832 immigrated to this country. In 1834 he married Ann Hunter, who was born in Ireland in 1801. About 1838 he removed to the town of Champion, and there remained until 1865, when he located in Wilna, on road 70, where he now resides with his son James. He had born to him eight children, of whom William served in Co. C, 94th N.Y. Vols., came home on furlough, and died November 25, 1864. Robert enlisted in Co. H, 186th N.Y. Vols., in 1864, and was taken prisoner at the battle of Petersburg, in 1865. James enlisted October 16, 1861, in Co. I, 94th N.Y. Vols., was is the battle of Cedar Mountain, August 9, 1862, in the battles of Rappahannock, Thoroughfare Gap, and second Bull Run, Chancellorsville, and Gettysburg; was taken prisoner and paroled; was discharged February 28, 1864, at Camp Parole, by reason of reenlistment as veteran volunteer; was in the battle of Weldon Railroad, and was again taken prisoner, August 19, 1864, and was confined in Libby Prison, and subsequently transfered to Buel Island and Salsibury, N.C. He was paroled February 28, 1865, and mustered our June 11, 1865. He married Sarah Ann, daughter of Benona Goldthrite, by whom he has had six children, viz.; Minnie B., Cora T., who died April 29, 1870, Adah E., J. Herbert, Cora E.., who died March 22, 1886, and George B. George Olley, Jr., enlisted in Co. I, 94th N.Y. Vols., and was drum-major of the regiment. He died in 1870. Samuel D., another son of George, Sr., died young. Mary Ann died at the age of 19 years. Margaret J. married Chester Goldthrite, and resides at Felt's Mills.

Adam Ormiston, a pioneer of Wilna, was born July 31, 1807, in Scotland, near Abbottsford, and in sight of the mansion and joining the estate of Sir Walter Scott. His ancestry were of Highland Scotch extraction. At the age of 12 years he came with his father's family to America and settled in Rossie, St. Lawrence County, arriving there in April, 1819. (His father's family consisted of seven sons and two daughters.) At the age of 24 years he married Margaret Robison, who had lately come from Scotland with her father's family, and they began married life on a farm near Antwerp village. During the summer of 1832 he bought a farm of 100 acres in the central part of Wilna, and in December, with one of his brothers, he went from Antwerp with an ox-team to this farm and build a log cabin, in the construction of which he did not use a nail, and did not pay out one cent for anything except for one window containing_ 7 by 9 lights, which cost him 75 cents. For floor they split straight-grained basswood as thin as they could, and hewed it smooth, the same material being used for doors; and for roof basswood troughs were laid, the first ones bark side down, and the upper ones, to break joints, bark side up. For the fire-place and chimney a rough stone was found in the woods and used with mud for mortar, which made a comfortable and warm house, in which they lived until he loaded his household goods and wife on an ox-sled, and with a cow, started for their future home in Wilna. His cabin was about a quarter of a mile from the public road. He could not reach it by the road made in December, and was compelled to make a new road, cutting brush and stamping the snow before the oxen as they proceeded. He was soon established in his new home, and then commenced a life of toil; but he was often heard to remark in after years were the happiest of his life, his wife being perfectly contented and happy, and both having good health.
Mr. and Mrs. Ormiston reared a family of two sons, James and William H., and four daughters, Mary, Jane, Betsey, and Margaret. His wife died of heart disease, November 1, 1875, aged 67 years. He died of pneumonia, October 2, 1888, aged 81 years. His sons both served in the Civil War. William H. enlisted as a private in Co. H. 2nd Regt. N.Y.H.A., October 14, 1861, and was mustered out of service a duty sergeant October 29, 1864. He participated in the battles of Bull Run, Spottsylvania, North Anna, Tolopotomy, Cold Harbor, Petersburg (1864), before Petersburg, Five Forks, South Side Railroad, Amelia Springs, Round Fort, and surrender of Lee. In the battle of Petersburg (1864) he was wounded three times, and since 1880 has been obliged to go with crutches, his disability resulting from injuries to the spine, caused by a wound in the back. James Ormiston enlisted as private in the 186th Regt. N.Y. Inf., in November, 1864, and served until the war closed.

John W. Owen, son of William and Sarah Owen, was born in Felt's Mills, October 28,1830. He attended the common schools until about 13 years of age, and then entered the academy at Canandaigua, where he remained four years. He was for two terms a student in the Central Medical College, Rochester, for two years practiced medicine in Avon, N.Y., and subsequently traveled and lectured on hygiene. In 1852 he located in Carthage, where he is now in practice. He married, first, Elvira Monroe, and second Ellen Burke.

George W. Parmeter, son of Snell, was born in Gouverneur, St. Lawrence County, April 14, 1844, and in 1860 removed to the town of Denmark, Lewis County. August 11, 1862, he enlisted in Co. M, 5th N.Y.H.A., was in the battle of Boliver Heights, July 4, 1864, and was discharged as corporal, June 26, 1865, and the same year located in Carthage, where he has since resided, and is one of the leading citizens of the town. January 1, 1868, he married Hattie A., daughter of Oren Dunham, of Denmark, Lewis County. Three other sons of Snell Parmeter served in the late war, namely: James C., who enlisted in Co. E, 20th N.Y. Cav., and died in Norfolk, Va., October 11, 1864; Francis C., also of Co. E, 20th N.Y. Cal., who died in Carthage, July 24, 1864, while on a sick furlough; and John B., who enlisted in Co. M, 5th N.Y.H.A., in 1862, discharged in December, 1862, reenlisted in Co. E, 20th N.Y. Cav., and served to the close of the war. He now resides in San Jose, Cal.

John I. Passenger came from Albany County, N.Y., to Wilna among the early settlers, and resided for a time near the Fulton neighborhood. He subsequently removed from this county, but in a few years returned. He was well known throughhout the county, and was said to have been the first who laid out the frame of a barn by square rule. He had born to him 12 children, eight of whom grew to maturity, and seven are now living, namely: Electa, John A., Catharine, James, Peter, Charles, and Diantha. James Passenger married Louisa, daughter of David Winney, and located on the farm where he now resides. He has two children, viz.: Nettie C. (Mrs. James J. Wilson), and Sherman W. Peter Passenger, son of John L., served in the late war in the 4th Michigan Cavalry, and was one of the company which captured Jeff. Davis at the close of the war. He now resides in Michigan. Diantha Passenger married Charles Ward, who enlisted in Co. F, 193d Regt. N.Y. Vols., March 6, 1865, and was discharged January 18, 1866. Mr. Ward was a pensioner, and died February 3, 1887.

Guy E. Penniman, son of Zurial, was born in the town of Rutland, January 4, 1828. In 1850 he married Madeline M., daughter of John Smith, of Wilna, and located in this town, on road 75, where he now resides. He has two children, Guy, who resides in Carthage, and Carrie (Mrs. Dexter Crowner). Zurial Penniman came from Keene, N.H., in 1815.

John Pool came from Johnstown, Fulton County, N.Y., to Jefferson County, about 1818, and settled at Great Bend, in the town of Champion, where he resided until 1822, when he removed to Natural Bridge, in Wilna, where he located upon the farm, on road 39, now occupied by his son David. He was a farmer, and died December 23, 1861. Of his seven children, three sons and one daughter are living, viz.; John, in Darlington, Wis.: Abram, in White Rock, Kansas; Jemima (Mrs. Stephen Cowen), in Luverne, Minnesota; and David on the old homestead in this town. David married Almira, daughter of P.R. Nichols, and they have three daughters and one son, viz.: Jay, Ester (Mrs. Frank Dimock), Alice (Mrs. A.J. Spencer), and Abbie (Mrs. Alvin Hart).

David Reynolds, son of John, was born in Sligo, Ireland, and about 1830 immigrated with his parents to this country and located in the town of Alexandria. He married Lois B. daughter of William Holmes, of Alexandria, in 1848, and located at Barnes settlement, and here remained until 1860, when he removed to Wilna and bought the farm on road 70 once occupied by Madam de Ferriet, and here resided until his death in 1881. His widow survives him and occupies the farm. They had 12 children, eight of whom are living, viz,: Sarah A., Mary J., John W., Ritta M., Emma J., Francis B. H., George A., and Charles E.E.

Calvin J. Ripley, son of John, was born July 24, 1842. In the fall of 1861 he enlisted in Co. I, 35th N.Y. Vols., and served two years. He reenlisted in 1863 in Co. F, 20th N.Y. Cav., and served until the close of the war in 1865. He was in nine general engagements. In 1867 he married Lydia M., daughter of Edward Cooper, and in 1875 located on road 1, in this town, where he now resides. He has two sons, C. J. and S. O., who reside at home.

Charles P. Ryther, son of Peter H., was born at Evans Mills, July 13, 1833. His father being a manufacturer of edged tools, etc., he learned that trade, and when 17 years old went to Oswego to learn the machinists' trade. He was South two years engineering on the Wilmington and Manchester and Nashville & Chattanooga railroads. He married Mary M. Degrout, of Oswego, who bore him four children, and died March 5, 1889. He carried on a machine shop in Theresa about 10 years, and in 1868 moved to Carthage, where he has since been in foundry and machine business. He has been president of the village four years.

Sanford Safford was born in Connecticut, February 9, 1773. He was a son of Major Samuel Safford, who, with three brothers, served in the Revolutionary war. He married Amy Brumley in 1796, and in 1804 removed to Lewis County, and located at Scott's Corners. He died in 1826, and his wife in 1835. His son, Bester B., born in 1796, married Patty Stockwell in 1817, and with his father served in the War of 1812. He died in 1852, and his wife in 1834. They had 10 children, of whom his son B.S. now lives in Carthage, and was born June 1, 1834. B.S. Safford served in Co. G, 3rd N.Y. Cav., and in Co. H, 26th N. Y. Cav., four years, and was a first lieutenant when discharged. He married Anna S., daughter of Charles E. and Lydia Peebles, in 1865, by whom he has had four children, viz.: Edith L., who died in 1871; Anna May and Edna Hope, who reside with their parents; and Leon B., who died in infancy.

Arthur J. Simmons, son of James, was born in Epsom, Surrey, England, May 5, 1829, and in 1849 immigrated to this country and located in the town of Le Ray, where he married Lydia A., daughter of Elisha Belcher. He located in the town of Wilna in 1856. August 4, 1862, he enlisted in Co. D, 10th N.Y. Art., and participated in the battles of Cold Harbor, Petersburg, and Cedar Creek, and in several skirmishes. He was discharged July 7, 1865, and is now a pensioner. He resides on South James street, in Carthage village, and has four children, viz.: Edgar A., Ellen M., Lovina A., and Henry E.

John Smith came from New Jersey, and located in the town of Wilna about 1823, on a farm, on road 62, where his son Alonzo now resides, and the old stone house he built is still standing. He was a farmer, and died in the old house, aged 84 years. He married Susanna Ryneer, and they had eight children, viz.; Larissa, Eveline, Julia, Madeline, Susanna, John, Jr., Alonzo, and Joseph. Madeline and John, Jr., are deceased.

Edward Spencer came from Massachusetts to Jefferson County at an early date, and engaged in farming. Darius H. Spencer, son of Edward, was born in this county. He married Cornelia Ann, daughter of James Duley, and settled on what is known as the Townsend farm, in Philadelphia. He cleared his land and engaged extensively in the manufacture of charcoal. He was struck by a falling tree and killed during a severe storm, in the town of Wilna, July 5, 1874. He had six children, viz.: Andrew J., who served in the late war, in Co. H, 185th N.Y. Vols., from September 8, 1864, to June, 1865, participated in several engagements, was wounded at Appomattox Court House at the time of Lee's surrender, and now resides at Natural Bridge, in this town; Winfield S., who resides on road 48; Dewitt C., of Port Leyden, Lewis County: Mary L.(Mrs. Andrew Tripp), of Denmark, Lewis County; Nettie M. (Mrs. Dr. G. D. Hewett), of West Carthage; and Ira D., a medical student in New York.

Orlo Stanard came from Saybrook, Conn., to Oneida County, and thence to Wilna in 1812, locating near what was known as the "Checkered House," where he built a shop and engaged in carpentering. He also built and ran several saw-mills, and bought and occupied the farms now owned by his sons George and La Fayette. He married Lurena Griffin, whose father, Enoch, was one of the first settlers in the town. Of their five children, four are living in Wilna, namely : Eliza (Mrs. John Chadwick), Lorinda (Mrs. S. Crowner), George and La Fayette. The latter married Emily Thompson and they have three children, Jennie A. (Mrs. John Purcell), Mary E. (Mrs. B. Ford), of Diana, Lewis County, and Grace, who lives with her parents.

John I. Van Antwerp, came from Johnstown to Wilna and located at Natural Bridge, where he lived a few years, when he removed to the farm now occupied by George Van Antwerp, and here remained until his death. Peter, the eldest son, married Esther A., daughter of Calvin Cowan, and died on the farm. His widow married Joseph Hastings.

John Vinier, Jr., was born in St. Johns, Canada, and in 1833 located in the village of Carthage, where he has since resided. He married Alice Yarto, in 1838, by whom he had 10 children, four of whom are living, viz.: Eleazer, who is engaged in the stove and tinware business; Frederick, who resides in Gouverneur, St. Lawrence County; George, who married Josephine, daughter of Patrick Collins; and Mary (Mrs. Victor Guyot), who resides in Carthage village.

Henry J. Welch, son of Benjamin and Electa (Hopkins) Welch, both natives of Connecticut, was born in Norwich, Chenango County, in 1834. He was reared upon his father's farm and received an academic education; commenced reading law in 1858, in the office of Col. John Wait, of Norwich, and was admitted in 1861. He clerked for Col. Wait nearly two years, locating in Carthage in 1863, and commenced practice with Charles T. Hammond, continuing, until 1864. In August, 1864, by special permit of Governor Seymour, he raised a company (Co. A) for the 186th N.Y.Infantry. The regiment organization was perfected with Bradley Winslow, colonel, in September of that year. Mr. Welch became captain of his company, and the same fall was elected major of the regiment by unanimous vote of line officers, at Sackets Harbor, but was defeated by Governor Seymour on account of politics. He then entered service as captain of his company, and served four months, taking part in the battle of Hatcher's Run. He returned home and resumed practice at Carthage, where he has since resided and followed the practice of his profession. For three years he was associated with A.H. Francis. Since then he has been alone. In August, 1867, he was admitted to Supreme Court practice. He has been president of the village four years. He organized the fire department, was a chief engineer 12 years. He wrote the history of Carthage in 1875, and has been foremost in all the improvements of the village. He also wrote the charter of the village. He is a member of E.B. Steele Post, 269, G.A. R., and was post commander in 1888. Mr. Welch is recognized as one of the best trial and criminal attorneys in Northern New York. In 1864 he married Zeolade Warren, of Champion, a daughter of an early settler.

Jonathan Wood came from Oneida County and in 1833, located in the northern part of Wilna, at what is called Wood's Mills, where he built a grist and saw-mill, which he conducted several years. He was supervisor of the town one term, was also assessor and justice of the peace, and died here in 1879. His son, Franklin, who now resides at Wood's Mills, was born in 1832, and in 1853 married Angelica D., daughter of Peter and Anna Hanson, by whom he has had five children, four of whom are living, viz.: Harlon G., Charles J., B.F., and Anna E. Mr. Wood is now one of the oldest residents in this town.

Levi Wood, son of Joshua A., was born in Le Ray, September 2, 1826. He learned the molder's trade in Watertown, and in 1851 married Lucinda M. Hotchkins, and located in Carthage, where he has since been working at his trade. He served one year in Co. D, 10th N.Y. H.A. He married, second, Catharine Tripp. His first wife bore him two children.


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